Blueline Tilefish with Tarragon Beurre Blanc

This is Lenny Rudow, editor of Spinsheet Publishing’s Rudow’s FishTalk with his beautiful Blueline Tilefish that he caught 50 miles off Ocean City, Maryland in 300+ feet of water. He’s a cute little bugger, isn’t he? (Ladies…I was talking about the fish…) with a clean shine and a comedic face. Totally unlike the face-only-a-mother-could-love Snakehead Fish Zach caught for us a few weeks back.

Blueline Tilefish feed off small crabs and shrimp which gives the meat a delicate, sweet flavor. That means you don’t want to add any heavy, overpowering ingredients. Today I did a very simple butter sauté with cherry tomatoes, capers, lemon and tarragon. So delicate, in fact, that I didn’t use any garlic or onions. That was hard to resist. And using only a few ingredients, this recipe takes little time to throw together.

Blueline Tilefish with Tarragon Beurre Blanc

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1 tablespoon butter
1/2 tablespoon EVOO
1 tablespoon flour
1 Tilefish fillet, about 1/2-3/4 lb
Sea Salt
Fresh ground pepper
1 lemon
1 tablespoon capers
2 cups sliced cherry or grape tomatoes
1 pinch of sugar
2 tablespoons fresh tarragon, minced

Slice the tomatoes in half and set aside. Slice the lemon in half. Juice one half of the lemon into a small dish, reserving the remaining half for garnish slices. Mince the tarragon.

Light your galley stove and heat up a large skillet, adding the butter and EVOO. Lightly salt and pepper the fish fillet. Sprinkle flour on both sides and rub to coat evenly. Sauté in the hot oil skillet for 3-4 minutes, until golden.

With a thin spatula, gently turn the fish over and sauté the other side. It’s a delicate fish so will fall apart it you try to pick it up with tongs or a fork. Use a spatula. Add the squeezed lemon juice to the pan. Sauté for another 3-4 minutes and remove to a serving platter. Reserve the oil and lemon mixture in the pan.

Keeping the pan on medium with the served oil and lemon, lightly sauté the tomatoes. Sprinkle on the capers. Add more sea salt and pepper. Sauté just until the tomatoes are warmed through. You want them to retain their firmness and shape. Add sea salt, black pepper and a pinch or two of sugar to taste.

Pour the tomato mixture onto the plated fish and sprinkle with tarragon.

This fillet was a perfect size to cut in half for two servings. It can be served alongside rice or pasta for an evening meal, or sprouts and watercress…or any salad…as we did for today’s lunch.

Blueline Tilefish with Tarragon Beurre Blanc

A delicious way to prepare one of the Atlantic's most tasty deepwater fish.

Servings: 2 people
Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp Butter
  • 1/2 tsp EVOO
  • 1 tbsp Butter
  • 1 1/2-3/4 lb Tilefish fillet
  • Sea Salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 Lemon
  • 1 tbsp Capers
  • 2 cups Slice cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 1 pinch Sugar
  • 2 tbsp Fresh tarragon, minced
Instructions
  1. Slice the tomatoes in half and set aside. Slice the lemon in half. Juice one half of the lemon into a small dish, reserving the remaining half for garnish slices. Mince the tarragon.

  2. Light your galley stove and heat up a large skillet, adding the butter and EVOO. Lightly salt and pepper the fish fillet. Sprinkle flour on both sides and rub to coat evenly. Sauté in the hot oil skillet for 3-4 minutes, until golden.

  3. With a thin spatula, gently turn the fish over and sauté the other side. It's a delicate fish so will fall apart it you try to pick it up with tongs or a fork. Add the squeezed lemon juice to the pan. Sauté for another 3-4 minutes and remove to a serving platter. Reserve the oil and lemon mixture in the pan.

  4. Keeping the pan on medium with the served oil and lemon, lightly sauté the tomatoes. Sprinkle on the capers. Add more sea salt and pepper. Sauté just until the tomatoes are warmed through. You want them to retain their firmness and shape.

  5. Pour the tomato mixture onto the plated fish and sprinkle with tarragon. Serve with a side salad and pasta or rice. 

Galley Cooking Recommendations

 

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